Sunday, June 8, 2014

The Real Plan for East and South Ukraine: Depopulation?

AKA "ethnic cleansing."

If the stories coming out of Ukraine after Poroshenko's inauguration are true, that there has been a massive escalation of violence by the so-called Ukrainian military, there can really only be one conclusion: the policy being implemented under the banner of "anti-terrorism" is strictly speaking one of depopulation and ethnic cleansing.

The trouble is, of course, we can't know with any certainty whether the stories are true or not, in part because of the overwhelming level of propaganda in western news media, and partly because there is so little real time coverage of what's going on, whether or not it's propaganda. There is an effective news blackout. But if the stories are true, it's truly monstrous.

Pogroms on a massive scale. Some seven to eight million, and perhaps more to be killed or dispossessed, made refugees, set on the run. The message is clear: refuse the demands and orders of the fascist new world order and pay the price. Be in the way of the ramrod of the fascist new world order and pay the price. The price is death and destruction. There is no appeal. There is no succor.

Depending on how you look at it, Russia will apparently stand and watch, either powerless to intervene or not inclined to do so.

The people themselves have choices: leave or die. Or leave and die.

And every single western government  is just fine with it, actively supports or looks away from the carnage and destruction and dispossession. Russia is practically mute. A rerun of "Creative destruction" on steroids.

The triumph of global fascism/Nazism is now assured.

Who ordered this Future?

2 comments:

  1. Thanks for the update, Ché. I've stopped following "current events" again and get most of my news from you these days.

    I think making accurate predictions about Putin's actions is difficult. What leads you to conclude he won't intervene? Wouldn't the people of Russia raise a stink and demand he act?

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    1. From afar, it looks like Putin is threading a very fine needle between the forces of oligarchic fascism and popular fascism -- within Russia and between Russia and the West.

      He's portrayed in Western propaganda as a dictator, but it's fairly obvious that he's a highly skilled politician who is not free, at all, to rule or behave as a dictator. He's constrained by the internal politics of the Kremlin (which probably haven't changed all that much since the days of the Tsars) and by the national politics of the Russian electorate. He has to stay on the good side of the people and on the good side of his own oligarchy -- or wind up like Yeltsin or Gorbachev, or worse.

      It seems clear to me that Kremlin politics are opposed to any direct Russian intervention in Ukraine -- it's not in the short or long term interests of the Russian oligarchy for one thing, and it seems that Russia is too militarily weak to do much in any case. An intervention, therefore, would be bad for Russia -- and it would be worse for the Russian-Ukrainians who are the supposed beneficiaries.

      I don't think the Russian people really care that much about Russian-speakers in Ukraine. In effect, everybody in Ukraine speaks Russian anyway; it's a regional lingua franca. As for the ethnic Russians who are currently under assault and pogrom by Right Sektor Ukrainians and their allies, it must be horrible to witness from so close as Russia is to the terror campaign. What I'm sensing is that Russians in Russia would "welcome home" any refugees from Ukraine, but they would not be inclined -- any more than the Kremlin is -- to rescue them in place.

      Put another way, Putin's behavior and most of the official action and statements out of the Kremlin indicate that Moscow offers no more than moral support to the Resistance to Kiev's coup-regime (or "Novorossiya" as it's been called), does not support independence for the region, does not wish to intervene directly in the conflict, and will not succumb to provocations from Kiev or the sponsors of the coup-regime. There doesn't seem to be a great deal of popular support in Russia for a direct intervention, either, though in Russia -- just like in the West -- popular support can be manipulated.

      My predictions have not been good on this matter, though. So, we'll see...

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